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History of Cornish

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Bicentennial Artwork by Ernie Rose, Rose Designs

The Cornish area was on the path of the Pequawket Trail. The word “Pequawket” is believed to mean “sandy land”. The Almouchiquois (Sokokis) Indians traveled the trail seasonally between Biddeford Pool on the ocean and the Mount Washington valley in search of food. The Sokokis were members of the highly respected Tortoise Clan of the eastern Algonquins. During the 1600s French fur traders bartered with the Indians, exchanging highly prized fur pelts for blankets, beads and other handicrafts made by the tribe. The French traders respected the Native Americans and the trade arrangements worked well. The Sokokis Indians living in the area were led by chief named Captain Sandy (also called Captain Sunday).

The first white settler in the Cornish area was a fur trader named Francis Small, who operated a small trading post. He became fast, trusting friends with Captain Sandy.

In the mid-1600s the British entered the scene and upset the balance of trade enjoyed between the French and the Indians. The British were less compassionate with the Indians. The so-called Indians Wars erupted because the Indians perceived that they were being taken advantage of by the British and complained about the manner in which they were being treated. The Massachusetts-based British regarded the Indians as savages and responded to the grumbling by marching on a Sokokis fortification, which was located just across the river in Hiram, at the meeting place of the Saco and Great Ossipee Rivers. Finding no Indians there, the British burned it to the ground and proceeded to another Indian fort on Ossipee Lake in New Hampshire. Where they took a couple of prisoners and headed back to Massachusetts.

Some members of Captain Sandy’s Sokokis tribe sought to take their revenge by torching Francis Small’s home. Captain Sandy was helpless to prevent the conflagration, but he did warn his friend and Small fled to the Kittery settlement near Portsmouth. Regretting the unfortunate loss that Small had suffered, Captain Sandy decided to trade a large tract of land with Francis Small. Cornish was part of the tract of land.

During the 1700s, the village that grew up was first called Francisborough, then Cornishville. The town center was originally located on the High Road and the town was incorporated as Cornish in 1794. A stage route was established along Main Street arrived in 1846. Handsome Victorian and Colonial homes were built along Main and Maple Streets and, between the years 1850 and 1860, teams of 80 oxen moved many homes down from the High Road to where the town center is today. It took 160 oxen to haul one house over the icy Saco River from the banks of Baldwin.

Because much of the history of early Cornish was lost in a fire, all of what you read in this column was gleaned from the works of authors and researchers Addie Small, Dr. William Teg, G.T. Ridlon Sr., Michael Chaney, and the Cornish Historical Society.

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Cornish Today

Scenic View of the White Mountains
Historic Pike Hall
Scenic View looking South West from Apple Acres Farm
Scenic View looking West from Apple Acres Farm

Did you know that Cornish is considered part of the foothills of New Hampshire's White Mountains? There are several places you can visit in Cornish to view majestic Mount Washington and other nearby peaks. Cornish is one of the towns making up what's called the Sacopee Valley area. The other towns are Baldwin, Hiram, Parsonsfield and Porter. By the way, the word “Sacopee” is derived from Saco and Ossipee, which are the two major rivers that flow along our borders. They and the numerous, nearby lakes and ponds offer great family fun. Our woods are filled with wildlife and offer scenic hiking, biking, XC skiing, hunting and more.

Before traveling through privately owned woods and across fields, please get permission first, especially if the land is posted. You'll find most owners agreeable if shown respect.

In the back of Pike Hall you will find the Town Office where you can get more information on the town. The main part of the building is often used for wedding receptions and for other events such as auctions, craft fairs, annual town meetings, etc.

Across the street from Thompson Park, in the center of town, is the picturesque Odd Fellows Hall. Three-season public rest rooms, maintained by CAB, can be found there.

We have a pretty healthy stock of elusive wildlife. Every once in a while they get bold enough to present themselves for a rare photo shoot. Little River, meanders through town. In the old days, the town folks used to skate on its icy surface. It is the power source for the water wheel on the Village Jewelers shop and tumbles over a waterfall visible from an outside dining deck.

Odd Fellows Hall Little River Historic Town Center
Historic Odd Fellow Hall Little River Looking West up Main Street into historic town center - Photo taken in 1994
Cornish United Church
of Christ Historic Cornish United Church of Christ on Main Street Historic Town Center
Historic Cornish United Church of Christ on Main Street Historic Cornish United Church of Christ on High Road - summer location Historic Bonney Memorial Library - Photo taken in 1994

 

 

 

 

 

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About CAB

CAB takes an active role in ensuring that town growth is manageable and in the best interest of the townspeople and the business community. Working with the town selectmen and community volunteers, CAB members were instrumental in drafting the town's comprehensive plan, its sign ordinance, and other major projects related to the growth and revitalization of Cornish.

Back in 1990, a group of Cornish business owners decided to meet and work together to create an organization to benefit the town's business and private sectors. A non-profit organization was established and named the Cornish Association of Businesses (CAB). The purpose of this corporation is to promote the general business and community welfare in the town of Cornish and act as a business league within the meaning of 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, its amendments and future provisions. Since its birth, CAB has donated thousand of dollars to aid local, civic organizations and to benefit deserving, town students with post-secondary school scholarships. It also gave birth to one of the town's largest annual events, the Cornish Apple Festival, which takes place on the last Saturday in September of each year.

Here are the upcoming dates:

CAB meetings are held every second Tuesday of the month at 7:00 PM at the Cornish United Church of Christ for discussion and planning of various goals, new ideas, and for community involvement. We extend an open invitation to all who wish to attend and help promote our local businesses*. For further information please call Scott Rowley, president of the Cornish Association of Business, at 625-4993 .

We extend an open invitation to all who wish to participate in the email meetings or to share their opinions via email or in person to anyone of the CAB Officers or Board of Directors. For further information please call Scott Rowley, president of the Cornish Association of Business, at 625-4993 I look forward to hearing your ideas and plans.

  • January, Tuesday the 14th 2014 (Minutes)
  • January, Tuesday the 28th 2014 (Board of Directors Meeting Minutes)
  • February, Tuesday the 11th 2014 (Minutes)
  • March, Tuesday the 11th 2014 (Minutes)
  • April, Tuesday the 8th 2014 (Minutes)
    • Spring Celebraton; Saturday April 26 - 7:30 am–6:30 pm - Several community events are taking place this day, see event calendar listing for details.
  • May, Tuesday the 13th 2014 (Minutes)
  • June, Tuesday the 10th 2014 (Minutes)
    • Strawberry Festival; June 28th
  • July, Wednesday the 9th 2014 (Revised Date)(Minutes)
  • August, Tuesday the 12th 2014 (Members meeting cancled, special Apple Festival meeting)
  • September, Tuesday the 9th 2014 (Minutes)
    • Apple Festival; September, Saturday the 27th 2014
  • October, Tuesday the 14th 2014
  • November, Tuesday the 11th 2014
    • Christmas in Cornish; Date to be announced
  • December (CAB Holiday Party, invites will be mailed to members.)

Click Here to download Adobe Reader which allows you to open the minutes and attached items we email to you.

Click Here to download meeting dates.

Archived Meeting Minutes (click here)

CAB membership:

With a very modest annual fee of $60.00†, any person who owns, operates, manages or conducts business in the Town of Cornish, County of York in the State of Maine, or any person whose business has an impact on the Cornish community, may join CAB.

Click Here to download a become a member or renew your membership form.

Click Here to read the benifits of being a member of CAB.

Click Here to download the association by-laws.

Benefits of a CAB membership:

  • Membership includes 1 internet listing on the Cornish Web site. (on average the site gets 160 hits an hour)
    • Addition catagory listings are available for $20.00†
  • New Membership includes 1 CAB decal promoting your membership.
  • Join before end of January 31, your membership will include 1 business listing in the annual CAB printed collateral which is distributed at the Maine Tourism Center locations in Fryeburg and Kittery. (Copies of the collateral is available to any CAB members upon request.)
  • Take advantage of membership discounts offered by CAB.
  • Influence and receive support from other Cornish and neighboring businesses.
  • Keep abreast of changes occurring in Cornish and neighboring businesses and towns.
  • Be part of an organization that reaches out to the local community and is making a difference.
  • Make your ideas, thoughts and concerns heard during our monthly meetings.
  • Become part of a valuable local business network that encourages members to utilize each other's services.
  • Influence the growth of the association.
  • Share your talents by volunteering on a committee(s) of your choice.
  • Make new friends while marketing your business.

 

Elected Cab Officers** (2014) Board Of Directors (2014)
  • Scott Rowley, President (207-625-4993)
  • Eileen McKinney, Vice President (207-625-8835)
  • Ernestine Bash, Secretary (207-625-2301)
  • Teresa Drown, Treasurer (207-625-0950)
  • Kathy Carr
  • John Dubois (Chairperson)
  • Brad Perkins
  • Steve Smith
  • Tom Thoman
  • Paul Watson

*You need to be a member to be counted as part of the forum and to vote.

Membership cost description: One owner will constitute one membership. The fee $60.00, at present, would be the annual membership fee. If the owner has more than one business or wanted to be listed in more than one category on the web site and brochure, the owner would pay $20.00 for each additional listing.

**ALL CAB OFFICERS ARE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

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